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Galileo is Paving the Way Towards Next Generation Applications
Marseille – While the Earth’s atmosphere and ground surfaces...
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Tuesday, February 27th, 2018

Code for Africa and Radiant.Earth Aim to Grow Data Journalism in Africa

Code for Africa, the continent’s largest federation of civic technology and data journalism labs, and Radiant.Earth, a non-profit advocating for open geospatial data for positive global impact, announced their partnership to harness open Earth imagery and tools for improved decision-making as well as better insight and transparency. Their combined efforts will focus on research for

Tuesday, February 20th, 2018

White Paper Provides Insight on Atmospheric Methane’s Impact on Global Warming

A new white paper developed by GTI’s Center for Methane Research (CMR) addresses questions regarding the impact of atmospheric methane in global warming—technically identified as radiative forcing—and what role fossil fuels play. The paper integrates greenhouse gas radiative forcing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, along with national and international annual greenhouse gas

Tuesday, February 13th, 2018

Farewell to Pioneering Pollution Sensor

On Jan. 31, 2018, NASA ended the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer’s (TES) almost 14-year career of discovery. Launched in 2004 on NASA’s Aura spacecraft, TES was the first instrument designed to monitor ozone in the lowest layers of the atmosphere directly from space. Its high-resolution observations led to new measurements of atmospheric gases that have altered

Tuesday, February 6th, 2018

Reducing the Footprint of a Greenhouse Gas More Potent than Carbon Dioxide

USC scientists have unlocked a new, more-efficient pathway for converting methane—a potent gas contributing to climate change—directly into basic chemicals for manufacturing plastics, agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals. In research published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, chemists at USC Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute say they have found a way to help utilize this abundant

Tuesday, January 30th, 2018

Specialized Sensors Perform in Extreme Environments

Sensors withstand extreme temperatures, pressures and aggressive chemicals By Will Meenan, Kaman Precision Products/Measuring It takes an extremely durable design to make reliable measurements in extreme conditions. Extreme environment position/displacement sensors perform where most sensors cannot survive. These sensors are designed to operate in the following environmental conditions: ·       High or cryogenic temperatures ·       Aggressive

Tuesday, January 23rd, 2018

Oceangate and 2G Robotics to Laser Scan Titanic Shipwreck and Debris Field

OceanGate Inc., a provider of manned submersible services, and 2G Robotics, which develops underwater laser scanners, formed a strategic alliance to capture laser data of the RMS Titanic shipwreck and debris field. 2G Robotics ULS-500 PRO underwater laser scanner will be installed on OceanGate’s Cyclops 2, the first manned submersible to survey the Titanic since

Tuesday, January 16th, 2018

2017 Was Third-Warmest Year on Record for United States

2017 will be remembered as a year of extremes for the United States as floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, drought, fires and freezes claimed hundreds of lives and visited economic hardship upon the nation. Recovery from the ravages of three major Atlantic hurricanes making landfall in the U.S. and an extreme and ongoing wildfire season in the

Monday, January 8th, 2018

Federally Funded Study Calls for Agencies to Join Forces on Climate Change

NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) should join forces to track changes in Earth’s temperature, according to a federally funded study on climate change. The three agencies should implement “a coordinated approach for their space-based environmental observations to further advance Earth science and applications for the next

Monday, January 1st, 2018

Wet Winters May Not Dampen Small Wildfires

NASA scientists conducting research on the connection between fuel moisture and fires uncovered a paradox: a wet winter corresponds to more small wildfires in the following fire season, not fewer, as is commonly assumed. Large fires behave more “logically,” with fewer large fires after a wet winter and more after a dry one. “This is

Monday, December 18th, 2017

Can Smart Water Systems Prevent Wildfires?

Along with the larger forces of climate change, another contributing factor to the fierce wildfires in California has been the dry soil conditions. Light rainfall, combined with heavy use of aquifers by large farms, has created perfect conditions for an inferno. Stories of homeowners saving their homes by turning on sprinklers remotely are not as

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