Sensors and Systems
Breaking News
Sea-Level Rise to Cause Major Economic Impact in Absence of Further Climate Action
Rising sea levels, a direct impact of the Earth’s...
Kratos XQ-58A Valkyrie Flies over Yuma in Fourth Successful Flight
SAN DIEGO – Kratos Defense & Security Solutions, Inc....
48-Foot Wingspan Autonomous Cargo Delivery Drone to be Unveiled at the 2020 Farnborough International Airshow
LOS ANGELES – Yates Electrospace Corporation (YEC), whose Silent Arrow...

Featured

image

Tuesday, January 28th, 2020

Sea-Level Rise to Cause Major Economic Impact in Absence of Further Climate Action

Rising sea levels, a direct impact of the Earth’s warming climate, is intensifying coastal flooding. The findings of a new study show that the projected negative economy-wide effects of coastal flooding are already significant until 2050, but are then predicted to increase substantially toward the end of the century if no further climate action on

Tuesday, January 21st, 2020

Flooding in Southern Iran

Heavy rainfall has triggered flooding in southern Iran, particularly in the Sistan and Baluchestan, Hormozgan and Kerman provinces. The downpour has led to blocked roads and destroyed bridges, crops and houses, displacing thousands of people. This image, captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, shows the extent of the flooding in the Sistan and Baluchestan province

Tuesday, January 7th, 2020

Mapping Soil Moisture In High Definition

Trying to gauge soil moisture across large areas—regions, nations, continents—is difficult, yet knowledge of this dimension of our ecosystem is extremely important for farmers, planners, scientists, insurance companies and anyone concerned about preparing for global environmental change. “Understanding these patterns is critical to national and international security,” said Rodrigo Vargas, associate professor of ecosystem ecology

Monday, December 16th, 2019

Greenland’s Rapid Melt Will Mean More Flooding

The Greenland Ice Sheet is rapidly melting, having lost 3.8 trillion tons of ice between 1992 and 2018, a new study from NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) finds. The study combined 26 independent satellite datasets to track global warming’s effect on Greenland, one of the largest ice sheets on Earth, and the ice

Tuesday, December 10th, 2019

Gulf Coast Corals Face Catastrophe

If coral reefs are the canary to the ocean’s coal mine, it’s getting awfully bleak in the Gulf of Mexico. A new study by Rice University Earth scientists asserts: Without a rapid and dramatic reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, fragile coral reefs in the Gulf of Mexico, like those around the world, face catastrophe.  That

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2019

New Maps of Salinity Reveal the Impact of Climate Variability on Oceans

The salinity of the ocean surface can be monitored from space using satellites to give a global view of the variable patterns of sea-surface salinity across the oceans. Unusual salinity levels may indicate the onset of extreme climate events, such as El Niño. Global maps of sea-surface salinity are particularly helpful for studying the water

Monday, November 25th, 2019

U.S. Cities Might Release More Methane Than Previously Thought

Major U.S. cities may be leaking far more methane into the atmosphere than government estimates suggest. New measurements found that up to twice as much gas is being released from six cities on the East Coast—Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia; Boston; New York; Providence, R.I.; and Baltimore—than estimates recorded by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Their combined

Tuesday, November 19th, 2019

Archaeologist Gains Unexpected Insights into Social Integration in 19th Century Mining Town

A historical archaeologist made a surprising discovery about daily life in an 1800s gold mining town by mapping artifacts in the Surfer scientific modeling package from Golden Software. Artifact distribution maps indicate Highland City, Mont., may have been a well-integrated town for its time. “Overseas Chinese immigrants worked in the mines of the American West

Tuesday, November 12th, 2019

Arctic Shifts to a Carbon Source due to Winter Soil Emissions

A NASA-funded study suggests winter carbon emissions in the Arctic may be adding more carbon into the atmosphere each year than is taken up by Arctic vegetation, marking a stark reversal for a region that has captured and stored carbon for tens of thousands of years. The study, published Oct. 21, 2019, in Nature Climate

Tuesday, November 5th, 2019

NASA Team Aids Hurricane Forecasting Using Satellite Data

NASA has for years used its cutting-edge space-based and airborne instruments to better understand hurricanes and give weather forecasters new insights they could use to improve the accuracy of their storm forecasts. A NASA program focused on bringing new weather research to bare on forecasting challenges is now tackling predictions of a hurricane’s strength. The

Page 1 of 25 1 2 3 4 5 6 25