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drought

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Monday, December 19th, 2016

Warmer Ocean Waters Seen to Spur Drought in Africa

Monitoring drought vital to success of humanitarian relief “Really?” and “Strange, but true” might be popular reactions to the idea that periodic El Niño events in the Pacific Ocean could have a long distance influence on drought conditions in Africa, almost half-a-world away. Unlikely as it may seem, these connections are widely accepted by climate

Monday, June 27th, 2016

Sierra Nevada Snowpack Not Likely to Recover From Drought Until 2019

Even with this winter's strong El Niño, the Sierra Nevada snowpack will likely take until 2019 to return to pre-drought levels, according to a new analysis led by UCLA hydrology researchers.

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016

Drought Alters Recovery of Rocky Mountain Forests After Fire

MADISON, Wis. — A changing climate is altering the ability of Rocky Mountain forests to recover from wildfire, according to a new study published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography. When warm, dry conditions lead to drought in the years following fires, it impedes the growth and establishment of vulnerable new post-fire seedlings. The

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015

Trees Tell Story of Regreening of West African Grasslands

October 7, 2015 — Regrowth of trees explains why grasslands in western Africa known as the Sahel have recovered after devastating droughts in the 1970s and 1980s, according to South Dakota State University professor Niall Hanan. The Sahel is a semiarid region with grasslands and scattered trees sandwiched between the Sahara Desert to the north

Sunday, August 24th, 2014

If You Think the Water Crisis Can’t Get Worse, Wait Until the Aquifers Are Drained

Aquifers provide us freshwater that makes up for surface water lost from drought-depleted lakes, rivers, and reservoirs. We are drawing down these hidden, mostly nonrenewable groundwater supplies at unsustainable rates in the western United States and in several dry regions globally, threatening our future. Read more in National Geographic

Monday, August 18th, 2014

New Satellite Data Will Help Farmers Facing Drought

About 60 percent of California is experiencing “exceptional drought,” the U.S. Drought Monitor’s most dire classification. The agency issued the same warning to Texas and the southeastern United States in 2012. California’s last two winters have been among the driest since records began in 1879. Without enough water in the soil, seeds can’t sprout roots,

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014

California Drought Impact of $2.2 billion and 17,100 Agricultural Jobs

A new study reveals that California’s historic drought will cost the state $2.2 billion in 2014 and result in the loss of more than 17,000 jobs. 

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

Parched West Is Using Up Underground Water

A new study by NASA and University of California, Irvine, scientists finds more than 75 percent of the water loss in the drought-stricken Colorado River Basin since late 2004 came from underground resources. The extent of groundwater loss may pose a greater threat to the water supply of the western United States than previously thought.

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

Cal Water Taps Sanborn to Combat Severe Drought

Recognizing the dire consequences of the state’s ongoing drought, now in its third consecutive year, the California Water Service Company (Cal Water) selected The Sanborn Map Company (Sanborn) in a competitive bidding process to leverage its geospatial data collection and remote sensing expertise against the severe drought.

Friday, May 23rd, 2014

What More Than a Decade of Drought Has Done to Lake Powell

Optimists would say this reservoir is half full. They’d be wrong: Lake Powell, the nation’s second-largest manmade reservoir, was at only 42 percent capacity as of Tuesday. Powell provides water and electricity to a bunch of Western states, but it’s getting dangerously close to becoming a useless puddle after more than a decade of drought.

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