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Environment

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

El Niño Could Drive Intense Season for Amazon Fires

Irvine, Calif., June 29, 2016 – The long-lasting effects of El Niño are projected to cause an intense fire season in the Amazon, according to the 2016 seasonal forecast from scientists at NASA and the University of California, Irvine. El Niño conditions in 2015 and early 2016 altered rainfall patterns around the world. In the

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

Climate Change Has Reshuffled UK Wildlife Calendar

Climate change is already affecting the UK’s wildlife calendar, and it’s likely this will continue into the future, according to new research published in the journal Nature. The results suggest that seasonal events – such as the timing of flowering in plants and bird breeding behaviour – are generally more sensitive to temperature change, than

Friday, June 24th, 2016

Better Information is Needed to Understand Extreme Weather

Scientists need more credible and relevant information to help communities become more resilient. Researchers need improved techniques to be able to understand why the climate is changing, and the part humans play in this process, according to Professor Peter Stott, who leads the Climate Monitoring and Attribution team at the Met Office and is also

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

Carbon Dioxide Biggest Player in Thawing Permafrost

Carbon dioxide emissions from dry and oxygen-rich environments will likely strengthen the climate forcing impact of thawing permafrost on top of methane release from oxygen-poor wetlands in the Arctic, according to a study in Nature Climate Change led by Northern Arizona University assistant research professor Christina Schädel. Schädel’s meta-analysis of 25 Arctic soil incubation studies

Monday, June 13th, 2016

Earth Scientists Push Boundaries of 3D Modeling

Robert Moucha, assistant professor of geophysics, and Gregory Ruetenik, a Ph.D. student in Earth sciences, have collaborated with Gregory Hoke, associate professor of Earth sciences, on a unique numerical modeling study that simulates changing terrain over millions of years. Their study shows that moderate changes in dynamic topography produce an erosional response in the form

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

New Cheap Method of Surveying Landscapes Can Capture Environmental Change

Cheap cameras on drones can be used to measure environmental change which affects billions of people around the world, new research from the University of Exeter shows. Experts have developed a new way of surveying vegetation which greatly advances the tools available to ecologists and land managers seeking understand dryland ecosystems. Using standard ‘point and

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

Hundreds of Cities Commit to Combating Emissions

Washington, D.C.—Over 200 cities have set greenhouse gas reduction goals or targets. Action in these cities, which represent a combined population of 439 million people, could propel countries to meet their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs)—–the national greenhouse gas reduction pledges embodied in the Paris Agreement. According to Can a City Be Sustainable?, the latest

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Russian-American Team Goes to Extremes to Answer Pressing Conservation Questions

NEW YORK, June 1, 2016—The Wrangel Island Federal Reserve, a remote island some 300 miles north of the Arctic Circle in Russia, was recently the site of an expedition to understand the impacts of climate change and polar bear predation on muskoxen—a Pleistocene relic that survived the woolly mammoths and woolly rhinos that once roamed

Wednesday, June 1st, 2016

Ecologists Advise an Increase in Prescribed Grassland Burning to Maintain Ecosystem, Livelihood

MANHATTAN, KANSAS — Kansas State University researchers have found a three-year absence of fire is the tipping point for the tallgrass prairie ecosystem and advise an increase in burning. A collaborative study, recently publish in Elsevier’s journal,Rangeland Ecology and Management, suggests many land managers in the Flint Hills need to increase burning frequency to more

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

Wildfire—It’s Not Spreading Like Wildfire

A new analysis of global data related to wildfire, published by the Royal Society, reveals major misconceptions about wildfire and its social and economic impacts. Prof. Stefan Doerr and Dr Cristina Santin from Swansea University’s College of Science carried out detailed analysis of global and regional data on fire occurrence, severity and its impacts on

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