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Thursday, July 14th, 2016

Using Wireless Interface, Operators Control Multiple Drones by Thinking of Various Tasks

A researcher at Arizona State University has discovered how to control multiple robotic drones using the human brain. A controller wears a skull cap outfitted with 128 electrodes wired to a computer. The device records electrical brain activity. If the controller moves a hand or thinks of something, certain areas light up. “I can see

Monday, July 11th, 2016

Climate Change is Affecting North American Fish

Climate change is already affecting inland fish across North America — including some fish that are popular with anglers. Scientists are seeing a variety of changes in how inland fish reproduce, grow, and where they can live, according to four new studies published this week in a special issue of Fisheries magazine. “Thanks to this synthesis,

Wednesday, July 6th, 2016

Understanding Forest Fire History Can Help Keep Forests Healthy

COLUMBIA, Mo. – For nearly a century, forest fires have been viewed by scientists and the public as dangerous and environmentally damaging disasters. However, recent research has shown that forest fires are vital to maintaining healthy forests. While people in the western portions of the U.S. experience forest fires often and know of their value,

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

As Sea Level Rises, Hudson River Wetlands May Expand

In the face of climate change impact and inevitable sea level rise, Cornell and Scenic Hudson scientists studying New York’s Hudson River estuary have forecast new intertidal wetlands, comprising perhaps 33 percent more wetland area by the year 2100. “In other parts of the world, sea level rise has led to net losses of tidal

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

Climate Study Finds Human Fingerprint in Northern Hemisphere Greening

OAK RIDGE, Tenn., June 29, 2016—A multinational team led by the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory Climate Change Science Institute has found the first positive correlation between human activity and enhanced vegetation growth. The research team, led by Jiafu Mao of the Ecosystem Simulation Science group in the Environmental Sciences Division, used new

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

Climate Change Has Reshuffled UK Wildlife Calendar

Climate change is already affecting the UK’s wildlife calendar, and it’s likely this will continue into the future, according to new research published in the journal Nature. The results suggest that seasonal events – such as the timing of flowering in plants and bird breeding behaviour – are generally more sensitive to temperature change, than

Wednesday, June 29th, 2016

Visual Cloud Computing Methods Could Help First Responders in Disaster Scenarios

COLUMBIA, Mo. – In natural or man-made disasters, the ability to process massive amounts of visual electronic data quickly and efficiently could mean the difference between life and death for survivors. Visual data created by numerous security cameras, personal mobile devices and aerial video provide useful data for first responders and law enforcement. That data

Monday, June 27th, 2016

Sierra Nevada Snowpack Not Likely to Recover From Drought Until 2019

Even with this winter's strong El Niño, the Sierra Nevada snowpack will likely take until 2019 to return to pre-drought levels, according to a new analysis led by UCLA hydrology researchers.

Monday, June 27th, 2016

Peat Bogs: From Fire Break to Fire Hazard

The peat bogs of the world, once waterlogged repositories of dead moss, are being converted into fuel-packed fire hazards that can burn for months and generate deadly smoke, warns a McMaster researcher.

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

Carbon Dioxide Biggest Player in Thawing Permafrost

Carbon dioxide emissions from dry and oxygen-rich environments will likely strengthen the climate forcing impact of thawing permafrost on top of methane release from oxygen-poor wetlands in the Arctic, according to a study in Nature Climate Change led by Northern Arizona University assistant research professor Christina Schädel. Schädel’s meta-analysis of 25 Arctic soil incubation studies

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