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Ocean

Monday, April 20th, 2015

Researchers Publish Findings on Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Marine Organisms on the Gulf Coast

April 20, 2015—On April 20, 2010, an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) rig caused a release of 200 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico before the well was capped on July 15, 2010. Close to 100,000 kilometers, including more than 1,000 total linear miles of coastlines in Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015

Scientists Find Missing Deepwater Horizon Oil

LEXINGTON, Ky., Feb. 9, 2015 – Since the Deepwater Horizon disaster occurred in 2010, scientists have been searching for millions of gallons of unaccounted oil – 11 to 30 percent of the oil estimated to have been spilled – in the Gulf of Mexico. Kevin Yeager, University of Kentucky professor in the Department of Earth

Friday, February 6th, 2015

Warm Past Points to Sea Level Rise

Scientists have for the first time constructed a detailed record of carbon dioxide fluctuations from the Pliocene epoch, around three million years ago, when the Earth was most recently warmer than today.

Thursday, February 5th, 2015

Improving the Water and Marine Life in Tampa Bay

GAINESVILLE, Fla., Feb. 5, 2015—University of Florida researchers will work with other scientists to study how to make the water and marine life in Tampa Bay healthier, which in turn could help protect Florida’s offshore ecosystems and fishing economy.

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015

FAU’s Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute Co-Chairs New Report on ‘Ocean Science Over the Next Decade’

Jan. 28, 2015—Shirley Pomponi, Ph.D., research professor and executive director of the NOAA Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research, and Technology at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute at Florida Atlantic University, is co-chair of a new report from the National Research Council that identifies ocean science research priorities over the next decade.

Friday, January 23rd, 2015

Sea-Level Rise, Climate Change Impacts on Marine Ecosystems, and Geohazards Are Among Priorities for Ocean Science Over Next Decade

WASHINGTON — A new report from the National Research Council identifies priority areas for ocean science research in the next decade, including the rate and impacts of sea-level rise, the effects of climate change on marine ecosystems, greater understanding of marine food webs, and better approaches for forecasting hazards such as mega-earthquakes and tsunamis. The

Wednesday, January 21st, 2015

Pioneer Study Examines Declining Coral Reef Health Due to Pesticides/Sea Surface Temperatures

Jan. 21, 2015—The declining health of coral reefs is intensifying worldwide at an alarming rate, due to the combined effects of land-based sources of pollution and climate change. Despite the persistent use of mosquito-control pesticides in populated coastal areas, studies examining the survival and physiological impacts on the early life stages of foundation species, like

Saturday, December 27th, 2014

Arctic Sea Ice Loss Not a Major Factor in Weather Extremes in the Lower Latitudes

There’s no doubt that Arctic sea ice is melting. However, new research finds little evidence supporting the idea that Arctic sea ice loss is a major factor behind weather extremes at lower latitudes. Research published in the Journal of Climate finds that sea ice loss accounts for only a small percentage of the warming in the Arctic atmosphere that

Saturday, December 27th, 2014

Five Years of Sea-Surface Salinity from Space

Measurements of salt held in surface seawater are becoming ever-more important for us to understand ocean circulation and Earth’s water cycle. ESA’s SMOS mission is proving essential to the quest.

Thursday, December 11th, 2014

Warmer Pacific Ocean Could Release Millions of Tons of Seafloor Methane

Off the West Coast of the United States, methane gas is trapped in frozen layers below the seafloor. New research from the University of Washington shows that water at intermediate depths is warming enough to cause these carbon deposits to melt, releasing methane into the sediments and surrounding water.

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