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Thursday, June 9th, 2016

Johns Hopkins Team Makes Hobby Drones Crash to Expose Design Flaws

Sales of drones—small flying machines equipped with cameras—are soaring. But new research by a Johns Hopkins computer security team has raised concerns about how easily hackers could cause these robotic devices to ignore their human controllers and land or, more drastically, crash. Five graduate students and their professor discovered three different ways to send rogue

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

Spring Weather in Texas Informs Monarch Butterfly Counts in the Midwest

EAST LANSING, Mich. – How can scientists better understand summer monarch butterfly populations in the Midwest? Check spring weather in Texas. This information is just one of many insights that researchers from Michigan State University gleaned from developing a new model to forecast ecological responses to climate change. The model, featured in the current issue

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

Yale Researchers Map 6,000 Years of Urban Settlements

As the growth of cities worldwide transforms humans into an “urban species,” many scholars question the sustainability of modern urbanization. But, in reality, there aren’t much data on long-term historical urbanization trends and patterns. A new Yale-led study offers fresh clarity on these historical trends, providing the first spatially explicit dataset of the location and size

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

Coral Reefs Fall Victim to Overfishing, Pollution, Ocean Warming

HOUSTON, June 7, 2016—One of the longest and largest studies of coral reef health ever undertaken finds that corals are declining worldwide because a variety of threats — overfishing, nutrient pollution and pathogenic disease — that ultimately become deadly in the face of higher ocean temperatures. The study by marine biologists from Rice University, Oregon

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Antarctic Coastline Images Reveal Four Decades of Ice Loss to Ocean

Part of Antarctica has been losing ice to the ocean for far longer than had been expected, satellite pictures reveal. A study of images along 2000km of West Antarctica’s coastline has shown the loss of about 1000km2 of ice – an area equivalent to the city of Berlin – over the past 40 years. Researchers

Wednesday, June 1st, 2016

Deep, Old Water Explains Why Antarctic Ocean Hasn’t Warmed

The waters surrounding Antarctica may be one of the last places to experience human-driven climate change. New research from the University of Washington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology finds that ocean currents explain why the seawater has stayed at roughly the same temperature while most of the rest of the planet has warmed. The

Wednesday, June 1st, 2016

Ecologists Advise an Increase in Prescribed Grassland Burning to Maintain Ecosystem, Livelihood

MANHATTAN, KANSAS — Kansas State University researchers have found a three-year absence of fire is the tipping point for the tallgrass prairie ecosystem and advise an increase in burning. A collaborative study, recently publish in Elsevier’s journal,Rangeland Ecology and Management, suggests many land managers in the Flint Hills need to increase burning frequency to more

Friday, May 27th, 2016

Spring Snow a No-Go?

Spring snowpack, relied on by ski resorts and water managers throughout the Western United States, may be more vulnerable to a warming climate in coming decades, according to a new University of Utah study. The study, accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, models the year-to-year variability in precipitation and temperature in Utah’s Wasatch Mountains

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

We Need the Full Picture to Plan for Climate Change Impacts

How can society plan for the future if we only look at individual issues in isolation? Climate change impact studies typically focus on a single sector such as agriculture, forestry or water, ignoring the implications of how different sectors interact. A new study, published inNature Climate Change, suggests that an integrated, cross-sectoral approach to climate

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

Optics Breakthrough to Revamp Night Vision

A breakthrough by an Australian collaboration of researchers could make infra-red technology easy-to-use and cheap, potentially saving millions of dollars in defence and other areas using sensing devices, and boosting applications of technology to a host of new areas, such as agriculture. Infra-red devices are used for improved vision through fog and for night vision

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