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Tuesday, December 6th, 2016

Arctic Sea Ice at Record Lows

Every northern fall and winter, cooling ocean and air temperatures cause the floating cap of Arctic sea ice to grow from its annual minimum extent toward a maximum between February and April. So far in 2016, however, the Arctic Ocean and neighboring seas have been slow to freeze, setting both daily and monthly record lows.

Monday, June 13th, 2016

Earth Scientists Push Boundaries of 3D Modeling

Robert Moucha, assistant professor of geophysics, and Gregory Ruetenik, a Ph.D. student in Earth sciences, have collaborated with Gregory Hoke, associate professor of Earth sciences, on a unique numerical modeling study that simulates changing terrain over millions of years. Their study shows that moderate changes in dynamic topography produce an erosional response in the form

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Bringing Climate Down to Earth

Climate change can often seem concerned mainly with carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases far above the Earth—but researchers also want to know what role things on the ground play. Yuki Hamada, a biophysical remote sensing scientist in the Environmental Science division at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, studies the realities of

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Maryland Climate and Health Report Identifies State’s Vulnerabilities to Climate Change

As world leaders convene in Washington, DC this week for the Climate Action 2016 summit, a new report by Maryland public health leaders, the Maryland Climate and Health Profile report, details the impacts of climate change on the health of Marylanders now and in the future. Developed by the University of Maryland School of Public

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Study Finds Ice Isn’t Being Lost from Greenland’s Interior

Scientists studying data from the top of the Greenland ice sheet have discovered that during winter in the center of the world’s largest island, temperature inversions and other low-level atmospheric phenomena effectively isolate the ice surface from the atmosphere — recycling water vapor and halting the loss or gain of ice. A team of climate

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Coalition for Urban Transitions Launched to Make the Economic Case for Better Urban Development

Washington, DC –  On Thursday, the New Climate Economy, along with C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group (C40) and the WRI Ross Centre for Sustainable Cities,launched the Coalition for Urban Transitions, the first major international initiative to make the economic case for better urban development globally. The announcement was made during a breakfast briefing, organized by C40 and the Compact of Mayors, with Anne Hidalgo, the Mayor of Paris (France); Kgosientso Ramokgopa, the Mayor of Tshwane (South Africa); and Denis Coderre, the Mayor of Montreal (Canada).

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

U.S. Climate-Adaptation Plans Long on Ideas, Short on Details, Priorities

ANN ARBOR—An analysis of more than 40 climate-adaptation plans from across the U.S. shows that local communities are good at developing strategies to combat the harmful effects of climate change but often fail to prioritize their goals or to provide implementation details. In the past decade, several dozen U.S. communities have created stand-alone climate-adaptation plans

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

Rare Ice Data Collected by Early ‘Citizen Scientists’ Confirms Warming Since Industrial Revolution

MADISON, Wis. — In 1442, 50 years before Columbus “sailed the ocean blue,” Shinto priests in Japan began keeping records of the annual freeze dates of a nearby lake. Along a Finnish river, starting in 1693, local merchants recorded the date the ice broke up each spring. These observations are among the oldest inland water

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

Model Predicts How Forests Will Respond to Climate Change

VANCOUVER, Wash.—Drought could render the U.S. Northeast’s mixed forests unsustainable after 2050 while Washington’s Cascade Mountains may require tropical and subtropical forest species, according to researchers using a new type of mathematical model at Washington State University. The Tolerance Distribution Model (TDM) is the first to use the tolerances of different types of forests to

Thursday, April 21st, 2016

City, Corporate Actions are Crucial to Global Climate Response, Researchers Say

At the UN this week envoys from more than 130 nations, including 60 world leaders, will convene to sign the Paris Climate Change Agreement. This historic deal, achieved during global climate talks last December, was bolstered by contributions from hundreds of city mayors and corporate CEOs who made their own climate pledges during the negotiations.

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