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Water

Monday, March 30th, 2015

Some Shallow-Groundwater Wells Affected by Bio-Based Fertilizers

Chapel Hill, N.C., March 26, 2015—Some shallow-groundwater wells next to or downhill from Orange County agricultural fields treated with bio-based fertilizers have nitrate levels above Environmental Protection Agency standards set for public water supplies, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey report. 

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Eastern Shore Contributes Excess Nutrients to Chesapeake Bay

BALTIMORE, Md., March 13, 2015—Excess fertilizer and manure applied to the Chesapeake Bay’s Eastern Shore are causing poor water-quality in streams that flow into the Bay, according to a new publication by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

Satellite Mapping to Analyse Rainfall Impact in Africa

March 11, 2015—A study carried out by the University of Leicester has shown the amount of rainfall many African areas receive has drastically changed in the last ten years. It is an essential factor for vegetation, which plays a vital role in African livelihoods.

Friday, March 6th, 2015

Flood And Drought Risk To Cities On Rise Even With No Climate Change

March 6, 2015—A heads-up to New York, Baltimore, Houston and Miami: a new study suggests that these metropolitan areas and others will increase their exposure to floods even in the absence of climate change, according to researchers from Texas A&M University. Their work is published in Global Environmental Change.

Saturday, February 28th, 2015

NOAA Tool Useful for Protecting Corals from Runoff

Feb. 26, 2015—Local officials are using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s OpenNSPECT, the Nonpoint Source Pollution and Erosion Comparison Tool, to estimate the amount of runoff, sediment, and pollutants that drain into coastal waters where corals reside, and to explore how various restoration and land use activities might impact corals.

Thursday, February 26th, 2015

New Interactive Flood Warning Maps for the Blue River Basin in Kansas and Missouri

Feb. 26, 2015—A new interactive online tool to improve flood warnings and emergency management is now available in selected parts of Johnson County, Kansas, and Jackson County, Missouri. These new maps were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Overland Park, Kansas, and the City of Kansas City, Missouri. 

Friday, February 20th, 2015

Study Reveals Recent Geologic History of Roanoke River Floodplain

Feb. 20, 2015—After surveying and analyzing centuries of evidence in the floodplain of the lower Roanoke River, USGS researchers, along with colleagues from the universities of Wisconsin and North Carolina, have developed a highly accurate estimate of sediment deposition amounts along the course of the river over three timescales — annual, decadal, and centennial. 

Tuesday, February 17th, 2015

NASA Study Finds Carbon Emissions Could Dramatically Increase Risk of U.S. Megadroughts

Feb. 12, 2015—Droughts in the U.S. Southwest and Central Plains during the last half of this century could be drier and longer than drought conditions seen in those regions in the last 1,000 years, according to a new NASA study.   The study, published Thursday in the journal Science Advances, is based on projections from

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

Study Finds Midwest Flooding More Frequent

Feb. 12, 2015—The U.S. Midwest and surrounding states have endured increasingly more frequent flood episodes over the past half-century, according to a study from the University of Iowa.

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015

Predicting Plant Responses to Drought

Feb. 10, 2015—A new U.S. Geological Survey study shows how plants’ vulnerability to drought varies across the landscape; factors such as plant structure and soil type where the plant is growing can either make them more vulnerable or protect them from declines.

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