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Ocean

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

Gulf of Mexico Alliance Releases Governors’ Action Plan III for Healthy and Resilient Coasts

Ocean Springs, Miss.—The Gulf of Mexico Alliance (Alliance) released the Governors’ Action Plan III For Healthy and Resilient Coasts today. This is the third major effort by the Alliance, approved by all five U.S. Gulf Coast State governors. The states of Alabama and Mississippi issued proclamations, declaring support for the plan and emphasizing the vision

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

Coral Reefs Fall Victim to Overfishing, Pollution, Ocean Warming

HOUSTON, June 7, 2016—One of the longest and largest studies of coral reef health ever undertaken finds that corals are declining worldwide because a variety of threats — overfishing, nutrient pollution and pathogenic disease — that ultimately become deadly in the face of higher ocean temperatures. The study by marine biologists from Rice University, Oregon

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Antarctic Coastline Images Reveal Four Decades of Ice Loss to Ocean

Part of Antarctica has been losing ice to the ocean for far longer than had been expected, satellite pictures reveal. A study of images along 2000km of West Antarctica’s coastline has shown the loss of about 1000km2 of ice – an area equivalent to the city of Berlin – over the past 40 years. Researchers

Wednesday, June 1st, 2016

Deep, Old Water Explains Why Antarctic Ocean Hasn’t Warmed

The waters surrounding Antarctica may be one of the last places to experience human-driven climate change. New research from the University of Washington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology finds that ocean currents explain why the seawater has stayed at roughly the same temperature while most of the rest of the planet has warmed. The

Monday, May 16th, 2016

Ocean Observatories Data Center Now Operational at Rutgers

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. – The data center for the pioneering Ocean Observatories Initiative, which collects and shares data from more than 800 sophisticated instruments and a transmission network across the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, is now operating at Rutgers University. Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) is collecting, processing

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

In Cities, Flooding and Rainfall Extremes to Rise as Climate Changes

Cities face harsher, more concentrated rainfall as climate change not only intensifies storms, but draws them into narrower bands of more intense downpours, UNSW engineers have found. This has major implications for existing stormwater infrastructure, particularly in large cities, which face higher risks of flash flooding. In the latest issue of Geophysical Research Letters, doctoral

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

Saharan Dust Makes Big Impact on Caribbean Waters

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Dust from the Saharan desert is bringing needed iron and other nutrients to underwater plants in the Caribbean, but bacteria may be the first thing to prosper from that dust. The dust is causing the bacteria to bloom and also become more toxic to humans and marine organisms. “This has been going

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

Mapping Global Sea-Level Variations with Sentinel-3A

Presented this week at ESA’s Living Planet Symposium in the Czech Republic, this new map shows a month of ‘sea-level anomaly’ measurements from Sentinel-3A. The satellite has only been in orbit since 16 February 2016 and is therefore still being commissioned for service. Nevertheless, measurements made by its radar altimeter between 3 March and 2

Monday, May 2nd, 2016

Widespread Loss of Ocean Oxygen to Become Noticeable in 2030s

WASHINGTON, DC—A drop in the amount of oxygen dissolved in the oceans due to climate change is already discernible in some parts of the world and should be evident across large parts of the ocean between 2030 and 2040, according to a new study. Scientists know that a warming climate can be expected to gradually

Thursday, April 28th, 2016

Widespread Loss of Ocean Oxygen to Become Noticeable in 2030s

BOULDER — A reduction in the amount of oxygen dissolved in the oceans due to climate change is already discernible in some parts of the world and should be evident across large regions of the oceans between 2030 and 2040, according to a new study led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Scientists

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