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Ocean

Monday, May 2nd, 2016

Widespread Loss of Ocean Oxygen to Become Noticeable in 2030s

WASHINGTON, DC—A drop in the amount of oxygen dissolved in the oceans due to climate change is already discernible in some parts of the world and should be evident across large parts of the ocean between 2030 and 2040, according to a new study. Scientists know that a warming climate can be expected to gradually

Thursday, April 28th, 2016

Widespread Loss of Ocean Oxygen to Become Noticeable in 2030s

BOULDER — A reduction in the amount of oxygen dissolved in the oceans due to climate change is already discernible in some parts of the world and should be evident across large regions of the oceans between 2030 and 2040, according to a new study led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Scientists

Thursday, April 28th, 2016

Beach Buoys Deployed to Detect Beach Contamination

Beachgoers may soon be able to know in a timely manner if the water is clean enough for swimming, thanks to some new technology developed by researchers from Michigan State University and the U.S. Geological Survey. The technology comes in the form of buoys that are deployed in the water near a beach. By combining

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

Science Partnership to Improve Prediction of Marine Environment

April 26, 2016—As an island nation, the sea has a deep and profound effect on the lives of many communities across the UK. The seas around the UK influence our weather, climate and local environments. Improving our understanding of the marine environment and how it affects us is the focus of a major collaboration programme

Monday, April 25th, 2016

Scientists Discover New Reef System at Mouth of Amazon River

Athens, Ga. – A new reef system has been found at the mouth of the Amazon River, the largest river by discharge of water in the world. As large rivers empty into the world’s oceans in areas known as plumes, they typically create gaps in the reef distribution along the tropical shelves—something that makes finding

Thursday, April 21st, 2016

Six Years After Deepwater Horizon Spill Still Looking for Answers

It’s been six years since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill occurred in the Gulf of Mexico and scientists are still working to understand how oil and other pollutants move in the ocean. The incident, which occurred in April 2010, is considered the largest accidental marine oil spill in history. University of Delaware’s Helga Huntley is

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Ocean Currents Push Phytoplankton—and Pollution—Around the Globe Faster Than Thought

The billions of single-celled marine organisms known as phytoplankton can drift from one region of the world’s oceans to almost any other place on the globe in less than a decade, Princeton University researchers have found. Unfortunately, the same principle can apply to plastic debris, radioactive particles and virtually any other man-made flotsam and jetsam

Thursday, April 7th, 2016

West Coast Scientists Sound Alarm for Changing Ocean Chemistry

CORVALLIS, Ore.—The ocean chemistry along the West Coast of North America is changing rapidly because of global carbon dioxide emissions, and the governments of Oregon, California, Washington and British Columbia can take actions now to offset and mitigate the effects of these changes. That is the conclusion of a 20-member panel of leading West Coast

Thursday, April 7th, 2016

Marine Preserve to Help Penguins in a ‘Predictably Unpredictable’ Place

Boersma, a conservationist and professor of biology at the University of Washington, is applauding new regulations by the government of Ecuador to protect the waters around the Galapagos Islands as a marine preserve. “It is very exciting,” said Boersma, who is a finalist for the 2016 Indianapolis Prize for her decades of penguin research and

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Analyzing the Risks and Effects of Rising Sea Levels in Norfolk, Va.

In Norfolk, Virginia, an East Coast city that’s home to the world’s largest naval station and important seaports, catastrophic flooding could damage more than homes and roads. A new study from Sandia National Laboratories assesses how much the city, its region and the nation would suffer in damages to national assets and lost economic activity if it does nothing to address rising sea levels.

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