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Tuesday, April 18th, 2017

Research Partnership Uses Satellite Technology for Oceanic Flow Study

The University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (UM) will deploy 550 SPOT Trace satellite trackers from Globalstar Inc. in its continued research expedition with the Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE), which is dedicated to forecasting the fate of oil dispersed into the environment to

Monday, February 20th, 2017

Oroville Lake Water Elevation Seen from Space

Toulouse – Due to recent and heavy rainfall, the water level of Lake Oroville has drastically increased, reaching a dangerous peak which led to the evacuation of over 100,000 people as a precaution, in case there was a dam failure. The Airbus SPOT 6 and SPOT 7 satellites constantly acquire imagery at 1.5m resolution on

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

World Ocean Council Works to Advance Arctic Sustainable Development at Key International Events

The World Ocean Council (WOC) CEO, Paul Holthus, engaged with stakeholders from business, government, science, environment and other communities at major Arctic events in Tromso, Norway in late January. At the Arctic Business Council Summit, Holthus outlined the WOC initiative to develop Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets and indicators particularly relevant to Arctic industries. The

Thursday, January 5th, 2017

Space Laser Reveals Cycle of Polar Phytoplankton

A new study using a NASA satellite instrument orbiting Earth found that small, environmental changes in polar food webs significantly influence the boom-and-bust cycles of phytoplankton. These findings, recently published in Nature Geoscience, will supply important data for ecosystem management, commercial fisheries and understanding of the interactions among Earth’s climate and key ocean ecosystems. “It’s

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

Seized Underwater Drone Raises Tension between U.S., China

The Chinese seizure of a U.S. underwater drone in waters near The Philippines is raising international concern as well as highlighting the growing strategic and tactical significance of unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs). According to a statement from Pentagon spokesman Peter Cook, “Using appropriate government-to-government channels, the Department of Defense has called upon China to immediately

Monday, December 19th, 2016

Warmer Ocean Waters Seen to Spur Drought in Africa

Monitoring drought vital to success of humanitarian relief “Really?” and “Strange, but true” might be popular reactions to the idea that periodic El Niño events in the Pacific Ocean could have a long distance influence on drought conditions in Africa, almost half-a-world away. Unlikely as it may seem, these connections are widely accepted by climate

Tuesday, November 29th, 2016

RapidScat Mission to Monitor Ocean Winds Ends

On Sept. 21, 2014, NASA scientists and engineers launched RapidScat toward the orbiting International Space Station, 250 miles above Earth’s surface, with a few objectives in mind: improve weather forecasting on Earth, provide cross-calibration for all international satellites that monitor ocean winds, and improve estimates of how ocean winds change throughout the day. Following the

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

Teledyne Optech Teams Up with The Ocean Cleanup to Study the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Teledyne Optech is pleased to announce it has partnered with The Ocean Cleanup in their Aerial Expedition research mission, where the Optech CZMIL (Coastal Zone Mapping and Imaging Lidar) successfully carried out the first in a series of low-speed, low-altitude survey flights across the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Every year, about eight million tons of

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

Polar Ice Reveals New Secrets of Earth’s Climate

A team of scientists have used air bubbles in polar ice from pre-industrial times to measure the sensitivity of the Earth’s land biosphere to changes in temperature. The paper published today in Nature Geoscience has verified and quantified the relationship for the first time and shown how it impacts the cycles of carbon between land,

Monday, July 25th, 2016

Isolated Coral Reefs Far from Human Activity Are Not Healthier

For the world’s coral reefs, the picture keeps getting gloomier. Although it’s widely assumed that both local and global factors are contributing to their decline, new research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows that isolated reefs far from human activities are in fact not healthier than those in more densely populated

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