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Environment

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Wildfires to Increase in Alaska with Future Climate Change

MISSOULA—Climate change is melting glaciers, reducing sea-ice cover and increasing wildlife activity – with some of the most dramatic impacts occurring in the northern high latitudes. New research by University of Montana affiliate scientist Adam Young and UM fire ecology Associate Professor Philip Higuera projects an increased probability of fires occurring in Alaskan boreal forest

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Highway Noise Deters Communication Between Birds

GAINESVILLE, Fla.—New research from University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researchers shows birds may be avoiding habitats near noisy highways because they can’t hear fellow birds’ alarms that warn them of attacking hawks or owls. Some highways cut through or run along natural areas, and researchers know that wild birds often make

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

Cities Hold the Key to a Livable Future

Washington, D.C.—Today, nearly 3.9 billion people–half of the world’s population–live in urban areas. By 2050 that number is expected to nearly double. According to Can a City Be Sustainable? (State of the World), the latest edition of the annual series from the Worldwatch Institute, there is no question cities will continue to grow; the only

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

Study Finds Ice Isn’t Being Lost from Greenland’s Interior

Scientists studying data from the top of the Greenland ice sheet have discovered that during winter in the center of the world’s largest island, temperature inversions and other low-level atmospheric phenomena effectively isolate the ice surface from the atmosphere — recycling water vapor and halting the loss or gain of ice. A team of climate

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

Better Integration of Land Use Impacts Needed Across EU Policies

Land is a valuable and limited resource. The environmental impact of land used for building new roads, houses or energy grids should be better integrated into European Union policies, according to a report released today by the European Environment Agency. A preliminary review on how land is used in the EU found that more attention

Friday, April 29th, 2016

Ice Loss Accelerating in Greenland’s Coastal Glaciers

HANOVER, N.H. – Surface meltwater draining through and underneath Greenland’s tidewater glaciers is accelerating their loss of ice mass, according to a Dartmouth study that sheds light on the relationship between meltwater and subglacial discharge. The findings appear in the journal Annals of Glaciology. A PDF is available on request. Greenland has the potential to

Friday, April 29th, 2016

Insect Outbreaks Reduce Wildfire Severity

Forest scientists have found an unexpected ‘silver lining’ to the insect outbreaks that have ravaged millions of trees across western North America. While insect outbreaks leave trees looking like matchsticks, a new University of Vermont-led study finds these hungry critters significantly reduce wildfire severity. The findings contrast sharply with popular attitudes – and some U.S.

Thursday, April 21st, 2016

City, Corporate Actions are Crucial to Global Climate Response, Researchers Say

At the UN this week envoys from more than 130 nations, including 60 world leaders, will convene to sign the Paris Climate Change Agreement. This historic deal, achieved during global climate talks last December, was bolstered by contributions from hundreds of city mayors and corporate CEOs who made their own climate pledges during the negotiations.

Monday, April 18th, 2016

Greenness Around Homes Linked to Lower Mortality

Women live longer in areas with more green vegetation, according to new research funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health. Women with the highest levels of vegetation, or greenness, near their homes had a 12 percent lower death rate compared to women with the lowest

Friday, April 15th, 2016

Fertilizer’s Legacy: Taking a Toll on Land and Water

Tempe, Ariz.—The world’s total human population has jumped to over 7.4 billion just this year. Feeding the human species takes a tremendous toll on our natural resources including water, soil and phosphorus — a chemical element in fertilizer essential for food production. In modern agriculture, fertilizer often leaks into waterways such as rivers, lakes and

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