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Environment

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Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

New Cheap Method of Surveying Landscapes Can Capture Environmental Change

Cheap cameras on drones can be used to measure environmental change which affects billions of people around the world, new research from the University of Exeter shows. Experts have developed a new way of surveying vegetation which greatly advances the tools available to ecologists and land managers seeking understand dryland ecosystems. Using standard ‘point and

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

Hundreds of Cities Commit to Combating Emissions

Washington, D.C.—Over 200 cities have set greenhouse gas reduction goals or targets. Action in these cities, which represent a combined population of 439 million people, could propel countries to meet their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs)—–the national greenhouse gas reduction pledges embodied in the Paris Agreement. According to Can a City Be Sustainable?, the latest

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Russian-American Team Goes to Extremes to Answer Pressing Conservation Questions

NEW YORK, June 1, 2016—The Wrangel Island Federal Reserve, a remote island some 300 miles north of the Arctic Circle in Russia, was recently the site of an expedition to understand the impacts of climate change and polar bear predation on muskoxen—a Pleistocene relic that survived the woolly mammoths and woolly rhinos that once roamed

Wednesday, June 1st, 2016

Ecologists Advise an Increase in Prescribed Grassland Burning to Maintain Ecosystem, Livelihood

MANHATTAN, KANSAS — Kansas State University researchers have found a three-year absence of fire is the tipping point for the tallgrass prairie ecosystem and advise an increase in burning. A collaborative study, recently publish in Elsevier’s journal,Rangeland Ecology and Management, suggests many land managers in the Flint Hills need to increase burning frequency to more

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

Wildfire—It’s Not Spreading Like Wildfire

A new analysis of global data related to wildfire, published by the Royal Society, reveals major misconceptions about wildfire and its social and economic impacts. Prof. Stefan Doerr and Dr Cristina Santin from Swansea University’s College of Science carried out detailed analysis of global and regional data on fire occurrence, severity and its impacts on

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

Chemical Emitted by Trees Can Impact St. Louis’ Ozone Levels

It is well known that the dog days of summer in St. Louis are hot, humid and hazy. On the warmest of these days, the air arrives from the south, bringing with it high temperatures, moisture and natural forest emissions of chemicals, known as hydrocarbons, from the Ozark Plateau. The hydrocarbons can interact with human-influenced

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Increased Vegetation in the Arctic Region May Counteract Global Warming

Climate change creates more shrub vegetation in barren, arctic ecosystems. A study at Lund University in Sweden shows that organisms, such as bacteria and fungi, are triggered to break down particularly nutritious dead parts of shrubbery. Meanwhile, the total amount of decomposition is reducing. This could have an inhibiting effect on global warming. A large

Friday, May 13th, 2016

Satellite Readings Show Methane and Carbon Dioxide on the Rise

Satellite readings show that atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide are continuing to increase despite global efforts to reduce emissions. Methane concentrations were somewhat constant until 2007, but since then have increased at about 0.3% per year, whereas global carbon dioxide levels continue to rise at about 0.5% per year. The results, presented this week at

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Wildfires to Increase in Alaska with Future Climate Change

MISSOULA—Climate change is melting glaciers, reducing sea-ice cover and increasing wildlife activity – with some of the most dramatic impacts occurring in the northern high latitudes. New research by University of Montana affiliate scientist Adam Young and UM fire ecology Associate Professor Philip Higuera projects an increased probability of fires occurring in Alaskan boreal forest

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Highway Noise Deters Communication Between Birds

GAINESVILLE, Fla.—New research from University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researchers shows birds may be avoiding habitats near noisy highways because they can’t hear fellow birds’ alarms that warn them of attacking hawks or owls. Some highways cut through or run along natural areas, and researchers know that wild birds often make

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