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Monday, April 4th, 2016

Potential of Satellite Remote Sensing to Monitor Species Diversity

The importance of measuring species diversity as an indicator of ecosystem health has been long recognized and it seems that satellite remote sensing (SRS) has proven to be one of the most cost-effective approaches to identify biodiversity hotspots and predict changes in species composition. What is the real potential of SRS and what are the

Monday, April 4th, 2016

Rainier Winters Occur Across the United States

Across the U.S., a greater percentage of winter precipitation is falling as rain, with potentially severe consequences in Western states where industries and cities depend on snowpack for water, and across the country wherever there is a winter sports economy.

Monday, April 4th, 2016

Massive Deforestation Found in Brazil’s Cerrado

Agricultural expansion in Brazil’s Cerrado is quickly chewing up rainforests and savannas – even altering the region’s water cycle, a new study finds.

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Analyzing the Risks and Effects of Rising Sea Levels in Norfolk, Va.

In Norfolk, Virginia, an East Coast city that’s home to the world’s largest naval station and important seaports, catastrophic flooding could damage more than homes and roads. A new study from Sandia National Laboratories assesses how much the city, its region and the nation would suffer in damages to national assets and lost economic activity if it does nothing to address rising sea levels.

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016

Ocean Temps Predict U.S. Heat Waves 50 Days Out, Study Finds

The formation of a distinct pattern of sea surface temperatures in the middle of the North Pacific Ocean can predict an increased chance of summertime heat waves in the eastern half of the United States up to 50 days in advance, according to a new study led by a scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

Monday, March 28th, 2016

GOES-R Satellite Could Provide Better Data for Hurricane Prediction

The launch of the GOES-R geostationary satellite in October 2016 could herald a new era for predicting hurricanes, according to Penn State researchers. The wealth of information from this new satellite, at time and space scales not previously possible, combined with advanced statistical hurricane prediction models, could enable more accurate predictions in the future. “For

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016

New Gulf of Mexico Ocean Observing System Data Helps Resource Managers Protect the Watershed

The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System (GCOOS) today announced the launch of two new data portals designed to help resource managers protect the environmental health of the waterways in the Gulf of Mexico watershed. The Hypoxia-Nutrient Data Portal, created in partnership with the Gulf of Mexico Alliance, and the Citizen Science Data Portal

Monday, March 21st, 2016

Europe Assesses Forest Ecosystems Status and Trends

The EEA report European forest ecosystems: state and trends, gives an updated health check on how our forests are coping with the many challenges they face. It assesses whether forest ecosystems can still manage to play their part providing key ‘services’ for the environment. Forests help regulate our climate and sustain watersheds, providing clean water.

Thursday, March 17th, 2016

Can Improved Agricultural Practices Help Combat Climate Change?

Did you know that over half of global non-carbon dioxide (non-CO2) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are accountable to agriculture? According to new a research study recently published in the Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences, this figure is set to rise substantially in the next two decades, especially in developing countries. However, by analysing US Environmental

Monday, March 14th, 2016

Wildland Fire Emissions Worse in Polluted Areas

RIVERSIDE, Calif.—When plant matter burns, it releases a complex mixture of gases and aerosols into the atmosphere. In forests subject to air pollution, these emissions may be more toxic than in areas of good air quality, according to a new study by the University of California, Riverside and the U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Research

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