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Tuesday, May 31st, 2016

$26 Billion Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems Market by 2025

Paris, Washington D.C., Montreal, Yokohama, May 31, 2016 – According to Euroconsult’s latest report, Prospects for Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems, the size of the professional RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems) manufacturing and services market is expected to grow significantly in the next ten years, from $1 billion in 2015 to $26 billion in 2025. The civil

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

Wildfire—It’s Not Spreading Like Wildfire

A new analysis of global data related to wildfire, published by the Royal Society, reveals major misconceptions about wildfire and its social and economic impacts. Prof. Stefan Doerr and Dr Cristina Santin from Swansea University’s College of Science carried out detailed analysis of global and regional data on fire occurrence, severity and its impacts on

Tuesday, May 24th, 2016

World Bank Group, International Partners Launch Six Principles for Dialogue on Climate Action

VIENNA, May 24, 2016—The World Bank Group, along with 12 international organizations, on Tuesday launched a new initiative that will make it easier for governments, the private sector and the global community to work together to lessen the impacts of climate change and for the private sector to play a more active role in the design

Monday, May 23rd, 2016

Australian Researchers Call to Minimize Drone Impact on Wildlife

University of Adelaide environmental researchers have called for a ‘code of best practice’ in using unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) for wildlife monitoring and protection, and other biological field research. The researchers, from the University’s Unmanned Research Aircraft Facility (URAF) or Adelaide Drone Hub, say that drones are a useful tool for field research and their

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Increased Vegetation in the Arctic Region May Counteract Global Warming

Climate change creates more shrub vegetation in barren, arctic ecosystems. A study at Lund University in Sweden shows that organisms, such as bacteria and fungi, are triggered to break down particularly nutritious dead parts of shrubbery. Meanwhile, the total amount of decomposition is reducing. This could have an inhibiting effect on global warming. A large

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

NOAA’s Premier Forecast Model Goes Four-dimensional

NOAA’s powerful new supercomputers paved the way for another upgrade to the U.S. Global Forecast System (GFS), NOAA’s primary model for weather prediction. Today’s upgrade builds on last year’s significant boost to the GFS, which more than doubled the resolution of the model grid from 27 kilometers to 13 kilometers, resulting in higher resolution model

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

Mapping Global Sea-Level Variations with Sentinel-3A

Presented this week at ESA’s Living Planet Symposium in the Czech Republic, this new map shows a month of ‘sea-level anomaly’ measurements from Sentinel-3A. The satellite has only been in orbit since 16 February 2016 and is therefore still being commissioned for service. Nevertheless, measurements made by its radar altimeter between 3 March and 2

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

Online Tool Maps Louisiana’s Water Flow Interactions to Preserve State’s Fresh Water

BATON ROUGE, La.—As part of an effort to preserve Louisiana’s fresh water resources, RTI International worked with The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to develop two online tools, released today, that offer a first-of-their-kind look at how Louisiana’s waters interact with each other. These tools will help fishermen, oystermen, planners, decision makers, and all Louisianans understand the

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016

Researchers Find Earth May Be Home to 1 Trillion Species

BLOOMINGTON, Ind.—Earth could contain nearly 1 trillion species, with only one-thousandth of 1 percent now identified, according to a study from biologists at Indiana University. The estimate, based on the intersection of large datasets and universal scaling laws, appears today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study’s authors are Jay T.

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

Model Predicts How Forests Will Respond to Climate Change

VANCOUVER, Wash.—Drought could render the U.S. Northeast’s mixed forests unsustainable after 2050 while Washington’s Cascade Mountains may require tropical and subtropical forest species, according to researchers using a new type of mathematical model at Washington State University. The Tolerance Distribution Model (TDM) is the first to use the tolerances of different types of forests to

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