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Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

New Field of Computational Sustainability Emerges

An interdisciplinary team of programmers, theorists, applied mathematicians, economists, biologists and environmental scientists have helped create a new field, computational sustainability, addressing challenges that computer scientists have not traditionally handled. Together, they tackle a range of issues from wildlife management to poverty reduction.

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Ocean Currents Push Phytoplankton—and Pollution—Around the Globe Faster Than Thought

The billions of single-celled marine organisms known as phytoplankton can drift from one region of the world’s oceans to almost any other place on the globe in less than a decade, Princeton University researchers have found. Unfortunately, the same principle can apply to plastic debris, radioactive particles and virtually any other man-made flotsam and jetsam

Monday, April 18th, 2016

Royal Navy Uses Pilotless Aircraft to Navigate Through Ice

A tiny pilotless aircraft, built by the University of Southampton, has launched from the Royal Navy’s ice patrol ship HMS Protector for the first time to assist with navigating through the Antarctic. The 3D-printed aircraft, along with a quadcopter, scouted the way for the survey ship so she could find her way through the thick

Monday, April 18th, 2016

Clear-Cutting Destabilizes Carbon in Forest Soils, Dartmouth Study Finds

Clear-cutting loosens up carbon stored in forest soils, increasing the chances it will return to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide and contribute to climate change, a Dartmouth College study shows.

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

Climate Science Project Aims to Understand Amazon Impacts

Further understanding the links and interactions between the Brazilian Amazon rainforest and the world’s climate is the focus of a major new research programme, funded by the Newton Fund The three-year £4-million program, known as Climate Science for Service Partnership (CSSP) Brazil, will bring together scientific researchers and organisations from the UK and Brazil, in

Tuesday, April 5th, 2016

Cold Mountain Streams Offer Climate Refuge

A new study offers hope for cold-water species in the face of climate change. The study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, addresses a longstanding paradox between predictions of widespread extinctions of cold-water species and a general lack of evidence for those extinctions despite decades of recent climate change. The

Monday, April 4th, 2016

Potential of Satellite Remote Sensing to Monitor Species Diversity

The importance of measuring species diversity as an indicator of ecosystem health has been long recognized and it seems that satellite remote sensing (SRS) has proven to be one of the most cost-effective approaches to identify biodiversity hotspots and predict changes in species composition. What is the real potential of SRS and what are the

Monday, April 4th, 2016

Rainier Winters Occur Across the United States

Across the U.S., a greater percentage of winter precipitation is falling as rain, with potentially severe consequences in Western states where industries and cities depend on snowpack for water, and across the country wherever there is a winter sports economy.

Monday, April 4th, 2016

Massive Deforestation Found in Brazil’s Cerrado

Agricultural expansion in Brazil’s Cerrado is quickly chewing up rainforests and savannas – even altering the region’s water cycle, a new study finds.

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Analyzing the Risks and Effects of Rising Sea Levels in Norfolk, Va.

In Norfolk, Virginia, an East Coast city that’s home to the world’s largest naval station and important seaports, catastrophic flooding could damage more than homes and roads. A new study from Sandia National Laboratories assesses how much the city, its region and the nation would suffer in damages to national assets and lost economic activity if it does nothing to address rising sea levels.

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